BROWN COUNTY, OHIO

OHGenWeb Project

Biographies

L

LEONARD, Joseph of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Joseph Leonard, farmer, P.O. Fayetteville, son of Joseph and Mary J. Leonard, was born in Belgium in 1820. In 1848, he came to the United States and settled in this township, where he farmed for Thomas Bamber three years. In 1851, he was married in Cincinnati to Janette, daughter of Frank and Mary Nichols. They have six children—Mary, Josephine, Joseph, Jane, Julia and Elizabeth. About 1867, Mr. Leonard bought the farm of 100 acres of land where he now lives, seventy of which are under cultivation. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 140.

LEONARD, Joseph P. of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Joseph P. Leonard, farmer, P.O. Fayetteville, son of John P. Leonard, was born in Green Township, this county, March 25, 1855. His parents came to this county in 1845. He was married in this township in 1877, to Mary, daughter of Joseph J. and Catherine Mull, born in this township. They have three children—Mary J., George J. and Laura E. In February, 1882, Mr. Leonard brought a farm of forty-nine and one-half acres of land in this township, two and one-half miles east of Chasetown, about forty acres of which are under cultivation. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 140.

LIMING, Joseph

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Joseph Liming was born and raised near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and served in several severe battles. In 1799, he moved to the West, and settled near Lexington, Ky., where he remained four years; he then moved to Ohio, and after a three years' residence there he moved to Clark Township, and settled on White Oak in 1806. At the same time, his father, Henry, and two other sons came from Pennsylvania, and settled on White Oak. Joseph raised a large family of children, viz.: Jonathan, Abraham, Samuel, Sarah, Joseph, William, James and Ahira Dellaplane. Samuel fought the Indians under Wayne, and Abraham, Joseph and James served in the war of 1812 until James was taken sick in the swamps near Detroit, and his two brothers were left to nurse him. James Liming was born in Pennsylvania and in 1815 he married Christina Wrestler, and located on Survey No. 2,936. She died in 1829, leaving seven children, and he married Eunice Leonard, by whom he had seven children. He kept a nursery, and supplied many orchards of Ohio and Indiana. He died in 1847. The number of the descendants of this name in the township is very large, and the family have figured very extensively in the religious, political and agricultural growth of the township.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 524.

LIMING, Joseph

submitted by Lee Liming

Joseph Liming and the C. G. and P. Railroad. I was walking in the woods in front of my house one day and found a tombstone. The tombstone was close to the railroad bed where the Cincinnati and Portsmouth Railroad used to run. The tombstone read: "Joseph Liming - 1746 to 1819 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania - Pennsylvania Rangers - Revolutionary War." I did some research on Joseph Liming and his family and found out much about them. Joseph Liming was born near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he remained throughout his childhood. He fought with the Pennsylvania Rangers during the Revolutionary War. During the war, he participated in several important battles. In 1799, he moved to the west, where he settled near Lexington, Kentucky. He remained in Kentucky for four years. He then moved to Ohio. After three years he moved to Clark Township, and settled on White Oak Creek, in 1806. At about the same time, his father, Henry Liming, and two of Joseph's brothers came from Pennsylvania and settled near White Oak Creek. Joseph and his wife reared a large family. He had eight children: six boys and two girls. Their names were Jonathan, Abraham, Samuel, Sarah, Joseph, William, James, and Ahira Lellaplane. His son, Samuel, fought the Indians under the command of General Anthony Wayne. Abraham, Joseph, and James fought in the War of 1812. They participated in this war until James fell sick in the swamps near Detroit, and his brothers had to nurse him back to health. James Liming, Joseph Liming's son, was born in Pennsylvania. In 1815, he married Christina Wrestler. They lived in this area on Survey No. 2, 936. James's wife, Christina, died in 1829, leaving James with seven children. He then married Eunice Leonard, by whom he had seven more children. He had a nursery and supplied many orchards of Ohio and Indiana. He died in 1847. Joseph Liming died in 1819, at the age of 73. He was one of the first settlers of this region and his family helped it grow. The number of his descendants in this area is very large. This family has been actively involved in this area's religious, political, and agricultural growth. About 50 feet from Joseph Liming's grave are the remnants of the Cincinnati and Portsmouth Railroad. (Joseph Liming was already dead by the time the railroad was built.) There is not much left to remind us of the once flourishing railroad. All that remains of the railroad near my house is a railroad bed that extends through my neighbor's woods. This raised bed of earth was erected so the railroad could continue over low spots in the land. About 1/4 of a mile from Joseph's grave, there are two stone columns rising up from White Oak Creek. They are what is left of a bridge, erected so that the railroad could cross the creek. I have seen these columns, and know that they show their age. Many stones have crumbled from the columns, and only a little iron can be seen. Joseph Liming and the railroad are both a part of Brown County's history. Joseph Liming represents a time of wilderness and untamed land. The railroad is a symbol of our progress. Carolee Mitchell Carolee Mitchell's essay won Second Place Trophy in the county competition. The essay contest was sponsored by the Brown County Historical Society in cooperation with the Brown County Office of Education

LIMING, Joseph

submitted by Lee Liming

Joseph Liming (1745-1819, son of Henry and Sarah Deleplaine Liming, has part of his story told in Beer's book, p. 524 and in Thompson's book, p. 522. Joseph was born about 1745 near Philadelphia, PA. In New Jersey, 1795, Joseph married Alice Applegate who was born in 1745 in Middleton, Monmouth Co., New Jersey. Her father was Hugh Hartshorne. In 1772 Joseph was in Allegheny Co., PA. He served in the Revolutionary War from 1778 - 1783 as a Pennsylvania Ranger from Westmoreland County in Thomas Moore's Company. (Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, Volume 23 pp. 224, 327, Joseph Limon, Lennon). Joseph was in several severe battles. In 1779 he moved his family near Lexington, KY where he stayed for four years. He then went to Mason Co., KY and later to Johnson Co., KY. In 1806 Joseph came to Clark Township, Brown Co., OH and settled near his father and two brothers. En route to a permanent location, the family camped at White Oak Creek near a spring where later the C. G. and P. (Cincinnati, Georgetown, and Portsmouth) Railroad Iron Bridge spanned the creek. (A grandson, Abram Jr., and his son Wesley Liming later owned land in this area). The Liming families later purchased large tracts of land between White Oak and Hamersville. Joseph and Alice had 8 children. Joseph died in 1819 and was buried "under an apple tree" on his own farm in Clark Township. (Thompson's book p. 522). The old Liming family cemetery is approximately 3 miles northwest of Georgetown on Gillette Station Road. It was reported there once were 12 or more inscribed stones in this cemetery, but all were destroyed, leaving only fieldstones as markers. (From Cemetery Inscriptions of Brown Co., OH, p. 59, Vol. I, 1976, by Linda H. Wilson). Since there was no stone for Joseph Liming, Virginia Lipps and Ethel Watson requested from the DAR a Revolutionary War monument for Joseph Liming. Being a descendant of Joseph Liming, Kenneth H. Liming signed the application. When the monument came in at the Mt. Orab depot, Kenneth hauled the monument from the station to near the old Liming cemetery off Gillette Station Road. Elmer Watson, and son Delmer Watson, Kenneth Liming and son Neal Liming loaded the monument on a wheelbarrow, along with a bag of sackrete and a shovel. The four pulled and pushed the load about 500 ft. east from Gillette Station Road and approximately 50 feet south over the old C. G. & P. railroad bed and set Joseph Liming's monument in the old Liming family cemetery. 1994 - Richey Wallace Liming

LIMING, Ora Lee

submitted by Lee Liming

Excerpt from Now When I was a Boy (1963) by Ora Lee Liming (1877-1967). I was born. Even the first event of my life I must report as told to me. I was there, yes, but I don't seem to remember. I can't even recollect I was born, so my parents told me. They were there, they should know. It was on a cold, bleak night of December 30, 1877. So I had a stormy beginning. This momentous event took place in the "Weaning House" on a farm Grandpa Neal bought just west of him from William Surrey, which includes the land on which our recent home is, and that of Charles Groves near by. The Groves are living in that same house. It got to be called the "Weaning House" because each of Grandpa Neal's sons lived in that house when he was first married. The heating unit in this house consisted of one big fireplace only, and I am told my father was kept very busy feeding the fire to keep us warm that night. Dr. Bivans, a fat, old country doctor from New Hope, three miles east, acted as stork for the occasion. We soon moved to Grandpa Liming's farm, into the log house where my father was born and grew up. Grandpa Liming had moved out of the log house in 1872 into the nice new house he had built just on the other side of the barnyard from the old house. My father was the oldest of his brothers and sisters (Grandpa's second set of children) and was the first one to be married, so the home farm came to him in the divide up of the estate after Grandpa's death. Grandpa Liming was a descendant of Joseph Liming, who was given a grant of land in what is now Clark Township, Brown County, Ohio, for his services in the Revolutionary War. He came here from Pennsylvania and settled near White Oak Creek in 1806, near what was called Gillet's Station on the CG&P Railroad which was built many years later. At about the same time, his father, Henry, and two other sons came to Ohio. There is no record of their activities except that the father became ill and died and is buried on the banks of the Ohio River near Aberdeen, Ohio. Joseph raised a large family, which took a big part in the growth of their country. Jonathan fought the Indians under "Mad" Anthony Wayne. Abraham, Joseph and James served in the War of 1812 until James became ill in the swamps near Detroit and the two brothers were left to take care of him. The story has been that the two made a sled and hauled the sick brother home. In the first election held in Clark Township in 1808, Jonathan and James were judges. Samuel was elected Trustee and Thomas was elected Supervisor. The number of votes cast was 80. Grandma Neal was a descendant of Captain Reed of The King's Army. Curious that my ancestors fought on opposite sides in The American Revolution, that made my mother a second cousin to Judge Stanley Reed of the U.S. Supreme Court. On her mother's side, Grandma Neal was descended from John Quincy Adams, sixth President of the United States. President Adams was born in 1767 and Grandma in 1835, but we can't be sure whether her mother, Sarah Adams, was a daughter of the President, or a granddaughter. My great grandfather, William Neal, born in what is now West Virginia, spent most of his young manhood years as a steamboat man, plying the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers where he earned a part of the money to buy land and build a home in what is now Brown County, Ohio. This land, 500 acres, all covered with good timber, was bought for $1.25 per acre. It is only a calculation that this took place about 1823. Uncle Ed Neal had a document, similar to a deed for this land with the signature of President Andrew Jackson on it. I wish I knew where it is now. The first thing to be done was to build a cabin to live in. A crude log cabin of two rooms was built in a vast wilderness with nothing but trails to lead to the most frequented places. The site is on what Roy Cahall now owns that was inherited by Uncle Dol Neal, and just south of Vernon Greeblin's land, near Estelle Neal's line fences. After a time, about 1824, he was married to Jane Brooks to share his fortune, good or bad. In the natural course of events his family grew too big and too numerous for the little cabin in the woods so a site for a new and larger home was selected about 1840 on what is now the New Hope and Bethel Pike, then a mere trail or dirt road1. Uncle Gus Neal inherited that portion of the land and tore down the "old home" about 1908, using much of the timber in his new house just east of there. Many years later his son, Vernon, built a home on the exact spot of the old home. My grandparents, to me, seemed rather stern, though very affable. I can't remember of either one of them really scolding me, although I was the oldest grandchild on either side for at least six years and must have been sort of a pest. I felt very important in the two families of big aunts and uncles. I was too young to remember very much about Grandpa and Grandma Liming but I knew enough that I would like to emulate the lives they lived. Grandpa was a rather stocky build, a little under six feet. He must have been a rugged man and sturdy. He had a long, white, full beard and long white hair which he usually kept cropped about even with the lobes of his ears. Grandpa Neal was tall, angular, raw boned, straight and close-shaven. Paradoxically, I never knew him to shave. Instead, he used ordinary scissors. His beard was not heavy. He would clip with the scissors in one hand while he felt the results with the other as he sat by the fire, and soon he would have a pretty smooth shave. Even at his death in his seventies he had no gray hairs to speak of and he wore it cropped like Grandpa Liming. My grandmothers were very much alike both in physical make up and in disposition. Both, as I remember them, were rather on the portly order. Both were always very jolly, though at times very serene and sincere. Grandma Neal had white swelling of the knee and for a number of years she used crutches. Then, being quite heavy, she went about in a wheel chair in her later years. As to religion, I never heard them profess to have any as such. Don't know if they ever belonged to any church or even attended any. I never knew of any of them declaiming their virtues from the mountain tops. I believe their religion was "I believe God is" and went on about their business of live and let live, doing and saying the little things that help to make better men, better women and a better country. It is unusual that my grandfather Neal inherited and occupied the home his father built; and my father inherited and occupied the home his father built. My grandfathers lived to about the same age, but I was only a small child when Grandpa Liming died. The death of this seemingly elderly man made a great impression on my childish mind. Grandpa Neal lived until I had three children of my own, so we had many opportunities for discussion and good advice. His remarks on thrift were especially base and worth remembering. The Liming men had some reputation for being adventuresome, and the Neals were generally conservative, so I had an opportunity for well balanced inherited traits.

LONG, Nelson of Eagle Township

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Nelson Long, Justice of the Peace, Fincastle, was born September 3, 1832, in White Oak Township, Highland County, Ohio; his parents were James and Jane Long. On October 16, 1856, he married Martha McVay, daughter of Solomon McVay. To them have been born one child, viz.: Clara B. In 1860, he moved to Eagle Township where he is presently engaged in the milling business and resides in Fincastle. He has served as Justice of the Peace in the township for five years.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 227.

LOUIS, Peter of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Peter Louis, farmer, P.O. Marathon, Clermont Co., Ohio, was born in France in 1823. When thirteen years old, he went to learn the tailor's trade. In 1845, he came to this country and worked his trade in New York City nearly two years, and then came to Cincinnati. He was married at Stone Lake Church, Clermont Co., Ohio, in 1848, to Catherine, daughter of John and Elizabeth Gauche, born in France in 1830. They have eight children—Mary E., Joseph, Ann, John E., Mary E., Augustus W., Francis A. and Catherine L. In the fall of 1841, Mr. Louis bought a farm of eighty acres of land in the southwestern part of this township; now has 132 acres, 100 of which are under cultivation. Mr. Louis still works at his trade at home; he has been Supervisor several years. Himself and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 140.

LOUTH, John, Jr.

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

John Louth, Jr., farmer, P.O. Bernard. John Louth, Sr., father of our subject, was born September 29, 1815 in the Province of Alsace, Germany. In 1831, with his parents, he emigrated to America, and settled in Franklin Township where his father remained until his decease. On March 27, 1838, he married Dorothea Hanselman, daughter of Charles and Christena Hanselman; to them have been born nine children; seven of whom are still living--John, Frederick, Catherine, Eva, Mary, Christena and Sophia. In the spring of 1859, he moved to the farm at present occupied by him in the southern portion of this township. John Louth, Jr., was born February 25, 1840, in Franklin Township. On March 19, 1867, he married Elizabeth Christman, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Christman; this union has been blessed with seven children, six of whom are still living--Mary E., Dorotha C., Catherine C., Elizabeth S., Emma M. and William E. In November, 1864, he enlisted in the Seventh Ohio Cavalry, in July, 1865, he was honorably discharged. Shortly after his marriage he moved to Red Oak Township, Highland County, where he remained about seven years; he then moved to the western portion of Eagle township, where he now resides. Mr. Louth has served as Trustee of Eagle Township and is the owner of 126 acres of land.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 227.

LYON, William

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

William Lyon was among the noted pioneers of Pleasant Township. He was born in Ireland, of Scotch-Irish parentage. In early life, William left his parents and crossed the ocean. He worked at a furnace in Philadelphia awhile, then wandered westward, and became a chain-carrier for Duncan Mcarthur in the surveys of southwestern Ohio. During this time, he made his home in Mason County, Ky. He was married to Anna Brown, in Kentucky, several years prior to 1800 and immediately emigrated to his land in the southern part of this township. His old age was passed in comfortable circumstances and he died in 1837. His wife survived him many years. His family consisted of only two children--Mary and Robert. Mary left no posterity, but the descendants of Robert still till the soil of their pioneer ancestor.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 372.

Brown County, Ohio

Yolanda Campbell Lifter, Brown County Coordinator

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